Truth Like the Sun

Truth Like the Sun

Book - 2012
Average Rating:
8
1
Rate this:
Roger Morgan, the promoter responsible for bringing the World's Fair to Seattle in 1962, runs for mayor in 2001, right after the tech bubble bursts, while budding reporter Helen Gulanos probes his secretive past.
Publisher: New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2012
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780307958686
030795868X
Branch Call Number: F LYN NVD
Characteristics: 253 p. ; 25 cm

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

a
antkarin
Oct 09, 2015

I enjoyed this as a fictional history of political Seattle. The depictions of "The Seattle "Process" are accurate as this 3rd-gen Seattleite can attest to.
However, it feels like a research project got out of hand, as if "what happened when -" steamrolled to "what if - ?".
Plenty of notable Seattle figures, and not enough heart.

s
StarGladiator
Jun 27, 2015

I recall just before Frederick & Nelson dissolved [the competitor to the old Bon Marche, today called Macy's], had certain nights set apart for High Net Worth Individuals to do their Christmas shopping, untroubled by the riff-raff - - one could surmise what that would bode for the future of the Emerald City? The author should have just called Morgan by his actual name, Paul Schell, although Schell never was a decent architect nor involved with the Space Needle. [Schell's first action was to bring the WTO to Seattle - - then taking off for his home on the French Riviera!]

b
broo
Oct 20, 2014

Chapters alternating between 1962, when promoter Roger Morgan brings the World's Fair to Seattle, and 2001, when he then runs for mayor in Seattle, right after the tech bubble bursts.

j
JimLoter
Aug 13, 2012

As a relatively recent Seattle transplant, I was intrigued by both historical perspectives offered here via alternating chapters: 1962, during the world's fair (and before I was born); and 2001, a couple years before I moved out here. I enjoyed the depictions of both a burgeoning Seattle on the brink of maturity, and one that is just coming off its zenith during the dot-com bubble.

Ultimately, however, the depictions of both time periods stop short of being compelling. Both scenes feel padded in the middle as if there just isn't enough story to keep them going. Once Roger Morgan's 1962 fair gets underway, there isn't much for him to do. And it takes a while for Helen Gulanos' investigation of mayoral candidate Morgan in 2001 to pick up steam. Thus, the overall rhythm of the book feels a bit off.

r
rhlarkin
Aug 06, 2012

Seattle is a sucker for nostalgic musing about the city's grittier, pre-Boeing Bust past. We've become the "Mad Men" antithesis and with this year's fiftieth anniversary of the Century 21 fair, the Space Needle has become the watershed mark of "when everything changed." In the midst of this, Lynch presents familiar fare. As other reviewers mentioned, the book's structure is hampered by awkward changes of perspective and voice as the chapters alternate between 1962 and 2001. The human characters dance from Gatsby to Gonzo with slim motivation. However, the people are just mannequins in Frederick & Nelson's windows. The main character is the city itself. Lynch manages to name check most of Seattle's icons, only skipping the grunge ones (perhaps to keep the novel under 300 pages?) By the end, I felt like I'd completed a Duck tour -- a little thrilled by all the sights, but short of understanding Seattle's soul.

m
mpfickes
Jul 21, 2012

Helen Gulanis comes to Seattle to work at the P.I.. Ambitious, singularly focused on winning the brass ring of journalism, a Pulitzer, she believes she's found her perfect subject when "Mr. Seattle," Roger Morgan, declares his candidacy for mayor.

Former journalist Jim Lynch interweaves the threads of his fictional character's 2001 mayoral bid with his rise to fame in 1962. Barely 30, a wunderkind from nowhere, golden-tongued Morgan manages to sell the city's timid elite on holding a World's Fair and building an iconic monument to its vision of the future.

The lyrical prose of Lynch's magical debut novel, The Highest Tide, is absent here. The awkward mechanics of juggling time and an unwieldy cast of characters weighs down a cardboard plot. Lynch fails to make these characters more than props to tell the Seattle history that clearly enthralls him.

h
hughsehler
Jul 21, 2012

I really enjoyed this book. I was three during the 1962 Worlds Fair so it was very nostalgic. I also love Jim Lynch's writing style and characters

m
melib614
Jul 05, 2012

My son lives in Seattle, so I was looking forward to reading this book. It was a "slow starter", but I kept reading hoping that it would become more interesting. It didn't! I had hoped that there would be lots of descriptive elements of the city, climate and people of Seattle and surrounding areas. Aside from mentioning a few streets, neighborhoods and of course the Space Needle, this could have been Anyplace USA. I did finish the book, but the story left many loose ends especially about the journalist, who is one of the main characters in the novel. I don't mind a few unanswered questions, but I would like to have found out how she got that scar on her neck!! I would not recommend this book.

Summary

Add a Summary

m
mpfickes
Jul 21, 2012

Helen Gulanis comes to Seattle to work at the P.I.. Ambitious, singularly focused on winning the brass ring of journalism, a Pulitzer, she believes she's found her perfect subject when "Mr. Seattle," Roger Morgan, declares his candidacy for mayor.

Former journalist Jim Lynch interweaves the threads of fictional character's 2001 mayoral bid with his rise to fame in 1962. Barely 30, a wunderkind from nowhere, golden-tongued Morgan manages to sell the city's timid elite on holding a World's Fair and building an iconic monument to its vision of the future.

The lyrical prose of Lynch's magical debut novel, The Highest Tide, is absent here. The awkward mechanics of juggling time and an unwieldy cast of characters weighs down a cardboard plot. Lynch fails to make these characters more than props to tell the Seattle history that clearly enthralls him.

Age Suitability

Add Age Suitability

There are no age suitabilities for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at NVDPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top