The Greedy Sparrow

The Greedy Sparrow

An Armenian Tale

Book - 2011
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A sparrow receives kindness from strangers and repays each act of kindness with a trick to get more, but at last, in a surprising twist, the sparrow is back with his original problem.
Publisher: Tarrytown, N.Y. : Marshall Cavendish Children, c2011
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780761458210
0761458212
Branch Call Number: jp KAS NVD
Characteristics: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 29 cm
Additional Contributors: Zaikina, Maria

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ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD Jul 18, 2012

Parents tend to ask librarians for recommendations of one version or another of the fairy and folktales they already know. “Can you recommend a good Hansel and Gretel?” That sort of thing. It’s the clever ‘rents who think to expand their offsprings’ horizons beyond the usual Grimm/Galdone fare. And once in a rare while I will get a parent who asks for “folktales”. That needlessly vague term is all the invitation I need. I like to keep track of my favorites from one year or another, and this year The Greedy Sparrow will be topping the list. Fun to read. Fun to look at. This one’s a beauty through and through that’ll sink into obscurity unless you pluck it up yourself. Give it a gander, won’t you?

m
maura2
Jan 06, 2012

Loved this book. My daughter did too!

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ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD Jul 18, 2012

ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 4 and 8

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ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD Jul 18, 2012

A little Author’s Note appears on the publication page of this book, which I appreciated. It states right from the start, “Armenian fables begin with ‘Once there was and was not’.” After we read these words we begin our tale. A sparrow with a thorn in its foot asks a baker to remove it. The woman does so gladly, burning it up afterwards, but when the sparrow returns and asks for his thorn back she has nothing to give him. Pleased, he takes some bread instead. Next, he visits a shepherd with a flock and asks the man to look after his bread. The fellow does for a time, but eats the bread when hunger overtakes him. As payment, the sparrow takes a sheep. Through these sneaky methods the sparrow exchanges a sheep for a human bride, a human bride for a lute, and finally he loses the lute, his ultimate prize, when he falls from a thorn tree. Lute gone. New thorn in his foot.

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ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD Jul 18, 2012

"Once there was and was not..."

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