Ella May and the Wishing Stone

Ella May and the Wishing Stone

Book - 2011
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Ella May finds a stone that she is convinced has the power to grant wishes. When she hesitates to share the magical stone with her friends, she discovers that keeping it all to herself is a sure way to lose her friends.
Publisher: Toronto, Ont. : Tundra Books, 2011
ISBN: 9781770492257
1770492259
Branch Call Number: jp FAG NVD
Characteristics: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 27 cm
Additional Contributors: Côté, Geneviève

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UPSHAWSTARS Mar 27, 2013

Ella May lost her friends because she was being greedy. The author wants us to know how to be a good friend.

n_blue Nov 28, 2012

"Cary Fagan is no newcomer to kids' books, and he does a great job here with both the fun, engaging story, and the fine tricks of repetition and structure that make 'Ella May and the Wishing Stone' ideal for the early reader. ... [A]n original and imaginative treatment of one of the hardest lessons of early childhood — sharing." — Quill & Quire

SPL_Childrens Aug 23, 2012

In Cary Fagan’s Ella May and the Wishing Stone, some“magical” results are also brought about by a special stone.

When Ella May visits the beach and finds a stone that is completely encircled with a dark stripe, she decides that such an unusual stone must have magical powers of some sort such as granting wishes.

Unfortunately, Ella May also decides that such a stone is too valuable to share with anyone, including her friends – who are understandably upset and hurt.

They go off to play together, creating their own magic stones.

Ella May is left by herself. It doesn’t take Ella May long to feel lonely and miss her friends.

Remembering the wishes that they had wanted to make with her stone, Ella May uses her imagination – instead of her stone – to make those wishes come true for them and win her friends back.

Sharing with friends (or siblings) is one of the most difficult lessons for young children to learn and put into practice.

A sensitive, engaging story such as Ella May and the Wishing Stone could perhaps help.
The simple but expressive watercolour illustrations by Genevieve Cote, a winner of the Canadian Governor General’s Award for Illustration, are wonderful enhancements to this wise yet entertaining story.

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SPL_Childrens Aug 23, 2012

SPL_Childrens thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 4 and 7

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