The Wackness

The Wackness

DVD - 2009
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Newly-inaugurated mayor, Rudolph Giuliani, is only beginning to implement his anti-fun initiatives against crimes like noisy portable radio, graffiti and public drunkenness. Set in this time, is troubled high school student Luke Shapiro who is a teenage pot dealer who forms a friendship with Dr. Jeffrey Squires, a psychiatrist and kindred lost soul. When the doctor proposes Luke trade him weed for therapy sessions, the two begin to explore both New York City and their own depression.
Publisher: Culver City, Calif. : Sony Pictures Home Entertainment, [2009]
ISBN: 9781435928985
1435928989
Branch Call Number: DVD 791.43 WAC NVD
Characteristics: 1 videodisc (99 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in

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s
SmartAssAWhip
Dec 15, 2015

Fairly standard coming-of-age tale. Frustrated teen, drama ensues, lessons learned. Was hoping for more of what I would call funny, but very few laughs for me.

mrzipan22 Mar 06, 2012

Kingsly as your typical shrink

markkluk Dec 23, 2011

Good cine, good storyline about real life and it's consequences, good script and music with very good actors leaving some great quipts for humor. A step short of pornographic in one scene. A good ending even.

b
bstudent
Jul 19, 2011

A good story. All this time I've been experiencing and thinking all these younger guys are thugs. I suppose because they talk so much different. I realize I just got old.

b
bdls206
May 11, 2011

Peck and Kingsley are both absolutely fantastic in this movie, I understand this isn't a film for everybody but it is worth watching. This is a off beat coming of age tale with a terrific soundtrack. I would recommend this movie to fans of movies like The Breakfast Club, and Pretty In Pink.

j
joseph
May 17, 2009

Skip It – The Wackness (2008) 99 min. I haven’t been this upset watching a film in a long time. This film about a young male teen selling drugs and fantasying about sex is absolutely uninteresting despite the potential. I wondered throughout the film why they’ve even thought of making such a movie (where’s the plot?). There are certain stories that are not “movie worthy”. This is one of them. This is dull, dull, dull. I had a very difficult time wading through this dull uninspired film. And to think that one of my favourite actors starred in this film – Ben Kingsley, who plays a psychotherapist.

m
Michael
May 12, 2009

Here's a quirky little Indie film that caught me totally unaware that I'd come away liking it for it's quiet rage against society at the time.
That's 90's New York City society - pre-9/11, in fact - a year after tough-guy new Republican Mayor Rudy Giuliani had come to power with his no-nonsense approach to ridding his famous city of crime, graffiti, and other socially deviant behaviour that was running rampant on the streets of the Big Apple.
So, when so many scenes have our two protagonists, Dr. Squires played by Ben Kingsley, and Luke Shapiro played by Josh Peck, either vandalizing public property with a black ink pen, smoking or selling dope in parks or city streets, you have to give them guarded props for "the wackness" in their insistence on remaining unconventional - even while you know this is no way for these two characters to be behaving... not when Squires is a psychiatrist, someone whose principal role in society is to help people deal with their deviant behaviour - not exacerbate it - and the adolescent Luke is seeking the shrink's help for the very anti-social behaviour that seems to consume them both.
Props to Director/Screen-writer Jonathan Levine for crossing the generation-gap so effectively in the two main characters, through not only the dialogue he wrote for them but also the comedic angst-filled touches and blissful romantic moments that come out of no where to leave you in your tracks, at the matter-of-factness of their delivery.
Then there's the enigmatic women characters he's given us... some like former 007 femme fatale Famke Jannsen, and new-comer Olivia Thirlby who in this film is nothing like the second-fiddle character she played in "Juno". These two manage to remain sexy and desirable even while they pine away the moments spent with our two male protagonists, who seem always staring at their navels or another part of their anatomy as the answer to their problems.
All-in-all, I wanted to not like this sordid little ditty given its weary content... but the delivery of such unusual comic drama, just when you don't expect it (try Sir Ben K. in a steamy phone booth scene with Mary-Kay Olsen!) and clever dialogue: Stephanie: "You're a virgin?", Luke: "No. Naw. I just haven't officially had sex yet."; and witty one-liners: Dr. Squires: "Sometimes it's right to do the wrong thing, and right now is one of those times" - all added up leaving me feeling like the movie's ultimate upbeat premise - which I suspect was: Whether you're just coming of age - or suffering from late-adolescence - life is always worth living despite the hardships!
Dr. Squires managed to role it off his tongue, even better, during one of his stoned stupors: "Embrace your pain, make it a part of you. You can't do this, you can't just give up. Life is hard and it's full of pain and what-not, but we take it cause there's great stuff too. And we can do it cause we have friends - because we have each other."

Quotes

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b
bdls206
May 11, 2011

Dr. Squires: The city's a disaster, Luke. Its not like it used to be. It's plastic. One big f**king happy meal.
Luke Shapiro: Some people like happy meals.
Dr. Squires: Some people like the Yankees too, Luke. It doesn't mean they're right.

b
bdls206
May 11, 2011

Dr. Squires: Don't touch my daughter.
Stephanie, Luke Shapiro: Stepdaughter!

b
bdls206
May 11, 2011

Luke Shapiro: Do me a favor, Steph?
Stephanie: Huh?
Luke Shapiro: Don't say nothin, ok? Just stand there til I leave. I wanna remember this. I've never done it before.
Stephanie: Never done what?
Luke Shapiro: Had my heart broken.

b
bdls206
May 11, 2011

Stephanie: You're a virgin?
Luke Shapiro: No. Naw. I just haven't officially had sex yet.

b
bdls206
May 11, 2011

Stephanie: Know what your problem is, Shapiro? It's that you just have this really shitty way of looking at things, ya know? I don't have that problem. I just look at the dopeness. But you, it's like you just look at the wackness, ya know?
Luke Shapiro: I do?
Stephanie: All you have to do is look at me. And kiss me.

Notices

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b
bdls206
May 11, 2011

Sexual Content: This title contains Sexual Content.

b
bdls206
May 11, 2011

Coarse Language: This title contains Coarse Language.

Age Suitability

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b
bdls206
May 11, 2011

bdls206 thinks this title is suitable for 17 years and over

Summary

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b
bdls206
May 11, 2011

It's the summer of 1994, and the streets of New York are pulsing with hip-hop. Set against this backdrop, a lonely teenager named Luke Shapiro spends his last summer before university selling marijuana throughout New York City, trading it with his unorthodox psychotherapist for treatment, while having a crush on his stepdaughter.

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