Grace at Low Tide

Grace at Low Tide

Book - 2005
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"Beth Webb Hart shares her knowledge [of the lowcountry] withskill, wisdom, and beauty."

- Pat Conroy, author of ThePrince of Tides

When a business venture goes sour, Charleston blue-bloodsBilly and Dee DeLoach uproot their family and move into the caretaker's cottageon what was once the family plantation estate on Edisto Island. While the restof her family falls to pieces, DeVeaux struggles to sustain them through herreluctant help and her stubborn hope.

Before the bankruptcy, the family had a graceful home in ahistoric Charleston neighborhood. Country clubs, cotillions, childhood friends,and a close-knit church group. Now they're living in a run-down cottage on anisland estate that is no longer in the family. DeVeaux has a restaurant job, acantankerous old truck, and mud on just about everything.

But something is wearing DeVeaux down. It's not living onthe island, which is actually kind of interesting. And it's not missing her oldfriends, who have developed an annoying fixation on boys. What really bothersDeVeaux is that being "ruined" has changed her dad into an ill-temperedjerk, and her mother just tiptoes around him. If the good Lord has a plan forsaving them, now might be a good time to start.

A gritty but gentle drawl of a story, Grace at Low Tide is atender and evocative portrait of a young girl embracing womanhood. With southernsociety as her backdrop, Beth Webb Hart paints for us a hard-luck familyscrabbling to find its heart again. It is a testimony to the small miracles oflove and loyalty--the gifts of grace that manage to keep us all afloat, even atour lowest ebb.

"a lovely, gifted writer."

-Publishers Weekly


Publisher: Nashville, Tenn. : WestBow Press, c2005
ISBN: 9781595540263
1595540261
Branch Call Number: F HAR NVD

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Librarian_Deb Aug 05, 2016

DeVeaux at fifteen should be enjoying all the comforts and concerns of a young women descended from blue-blood in the south. But her father has squandered their money in shaky business deals and now they have been forced to move from their Charleston home to the caretaker's cottage on the family plantation. DeVeaux is only fifty miles away from her former life, but can hardly stand to go back and endure the looks from her former classmates when they wheel into town in their beat up, muddy truck. But she does have good friends in town though, especially at her church. And she needs all the support she can get, since her father is not taking his humiliation well at all. He is prone to bursts of temper that result in scenes where things get thrown into the nearby river--even Christmas trees. DeVeaux desperately needs God's help to love her family, but how long will it take for the Lord to work things out for them?
The slow pace of this story allows the reader to experience the life of DeVeaux and her family in depth. DeVeaux's struggles with faith and her emotions are strong and her character is painted in very realistic colors. She has spiritual advisors and talks to God throughout the book, but the spiritual issues don't seem forced by the author at all. The setting also comes across very vividly, the details about southern society and the landscape effectively transport the reader to another place. It almost seems like another time as well, with the traditions of debutant balls and Maum Bess's talk about spirits.
This book has depth and is one of those to be savored. Read it slowly to take in the lush southern setting and experience the pains of a young girl growing up in a family situation that forces her to be wise beyond her years

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